The AFM group

We are the new AFM group at the chemistry department. We use the AFM to characterize surfaces in general. We measure a wide range of chemical and physical parameters governing the properties in surfaces at surfaces or close to surfaces. The basic AFM image the topography of a surface with nm resolution, in some cases Atomic resolution can be achieved. More advanced AFM covers modes that can image properties at the surface in air or in water. In force mapping we can among several things extract information about elasticity, adhesion, hydrophobicity and surface charge. By attaching molecules to the tip we can investigate specific molecular interactions with surfaces. Other interesting modes cover electrostatic/magnetic forces and measuring the electrical conductivity in nanometer sized objects.

Recently we acquired a AFM-IR that enabled us to gain chemical information along with the AFM images. We can therefore in principle combine complete chemical and physical information at surfaces with nanometer resolution, thus getting a comprehensible understanding of surfaces or nanomaterial on surfaces. Using a combination of techniques we are now studying the oldest remains of life in samples from Greenland and meteorites from the young solar system, to learn more about the origin of life here on earth.